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The Immortal Fire
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Neil Swaab, illus
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The Immortal Fire
Cronus Chronicles #3

After their near-fatal battle with Poseidon, Charlotte and Zee would love nothing more than to relax and forget all over again that the Greek gods are real. But with the world in peril and no one else to save it, that just isn’t an option. Charlotte and Zee meet the Prometheans, an ancient brotherhood trying to protect mankind from the gods, who have finally found a weapon capable of bringing Zeus to his knees. But using it will come at a great cost, one Charlotte and Zee are not willing to pay. They strike out on their own for Mount Olympus, with the Prometheans, an angry Chimera, and all sorts of mythological beings on their tail.

Reviews

“In this conclusion to the series, Charlotte and her mild-mannered English cousin, Zee, continue to go toe-to-toe with threatening gods, goddesses, and a menagerie of mythological serpents, nymphs, and demons. This novel begins after a pleasant family cruise runs amok and a surly Poseidon jettisons Charlotte halfway around the world, and she is compelled to face off against tumultuous and arrogant gods. This time, tsunamis, natural disasters, and monsters from Hades are destroying the world. Fate steers the cousins to Olympus to have a serious chat with Zeus, restore Earth to order, and save all of humanity. And Charlotte thought seventh-grade math was rough! The action rarely stops, gathers momentum, and goes extreme. Following the 13-year-old cousins as they duck in and out of trouble is half the fun; meeting the irascible and complicated cast of Olympian characters is the rest. From a cameo appearance of Apollo roller-skating around the crystal decadence of Olympus to the girls' eventual confrontation with a thunderously lusty but mostly ineffectual Zeus, the humor is raw and rich. Complementing the story's action, and tempering the humor, is the reappearance of the demonic Philonecron, Poseidon's psychotic grandson. He lurks and schemes in the shadows, creating ever more tension. The young mortals right the immoral wrongs of the gods, but it's the deft blend of intricate plot development, flippant tone, and a fresh twist on an ancient theme that gives this novel its winning finish.” —Alison Follos, North Country School, Lake Placid, NY, School Library Journal

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